Brighton, NY

This is a listing of some of the Don Hershey homes in Brighton, NY. It includes information such as the year it was built, the name of the original owner and other descriptive information. In some instances, there is a link to photos of the home. Just click on the “Photos” link for that home. This is a work in progress so by no means a complete listing. If you know of other homes that belong on this list, please comment here.

Allens Creek Road
Chas Johnson

240 Allens Creek Road
1952 (Hershey designed the addition and entry in 1984)
H. Allen and Susie Spencer
A center entrance colonial. It was his last project.
Across from Allendale Columbia School
More information

200 Ambassador Drive
1955 (or 1958 per 2nd owner, Ms. Atkinson)
W. Feinbloom (also per Atkinson, Feinbloom’s daughter is named Rusitsky – see 3493 East Ave.)

Ashbourne
1956
Photos

10 Bretton Woods Drive
Al M
(off East Ave)
Photo

Brighton-Henrietta Townline Road
(There may be one or more along this road.)

129 Brookside Drive
1934
Lawrence O. and Pauline S. Neel
Redrew contractor plans on colonial
Jim Weller wrote: It was built about 1930 with 3.5 baths, 4 bdrms, 3526 sfla. The house was constructed on lot #41 of the East Brook Side Realty Co., Inc. subdivision. Lawrence was the Sales Manager for the Genesee Brewing Co., Inc. They stayed in the house for about 15 months. In 1936 they moved into a home at 145 Brookside Dr., (lot #38 of the Brookside Subdivision).

145 Brookside Drive
1935
Harold L. & May P. Brainard
Plans & Sys House (Neel had Hershey do 2 houses per Hershey’s notes. #36 and #39. Don’t know which is which right now.)
Jim Weller wrote: The first owners/occupants of 145 Brookside were Harold L. & May P. Brainard. They sold to Lawrence and Pauline Neel in 1936. The Neels remained in this dwelling until 1951. Both Lawrence and his wife were born about 1900 in Missouri. They sold to Frank B. & Aileen F. Alberts. Frank was a general agent with Aetna Life. The Alberts sold in 1978 to David M. and Charlotte H. Jacobstein. David was a lawyer. After a few more owners, the beer connection was re-established when the house was acquired by John B. & Judith Henderson. John was the Pres. and COO of the High Falls Brewing Co.

111 Brookwood
Photo

180 Clover Hills Drive
(to be demolished)
Photos

203 Clover Hills Drive
1979
Dr. William A. and Brenda Dolan
Architectural Board Hearing 5/7/1980
Hershey made a deposition in court on 4/9/87 in case between owners and builder William H. Rampe. Owner had not paid Rampe.
Photo

406 Clover Hills Drive
1947-1949 (1960?)
Wallace (Lawrence?) Wood

Clover Hills Drive
1947
Kent Williams
Brick house

Clover Hills Drive
1950 (1960?)
Warren Phillips
Radiant heat in the floor

Clover Hills Drive
1947
Dr. Art Elden
New stone house

Clover Hills Drive
Arthur Nolte

145 Clover Hills Drive
Ed Carmen
Williams House alteration and addition

Clover Hills Drive
1969-1970 (1976?)
Dr. Burdette Koop
Alteration Addition great room

1666 Clover Street
1981
Natasha and Milton Dykman
See the article about the party the Dykmans held for Don Hershey
Photos

Corwin Road
Photo

245 Council Rock Avenue
1945
Milt Kroll
Received Blue Ribbon Award, NYS Central Chapter, 1949
Photo

285 Council Rock Avenue
1951
Dr. Ellis Ring
Radiant heat, Lot# R-216-217
Photo

344 Council Rock Avenue
1950-1951
Dr. Melvin and Annette Waldman
Lot# R-221-222. Sunken living room
Per. Steel Roch Products floor (Steel perimeter)
Honorary Jury Award, Central Chapter
Photos

Council Rock Avenue
1951
Earl Slessinger (Slesinger?)
Radiant heat, Lot # R-180, (#s 334, 321, 300 look like Hersheys. Could it be one of these numbers?)

Council Rock Avenue
#s 334, 321, 300 look like Hersheys.

Council Rock Avenue
Photos of 3 other homes (one of them of the Slesinger House – above)

277 Dunrovin Lane
1959
Mr. Wilson (of Wilson Hardware on Monroe Avenue)
Photos
This home is on the market as of August 7, 2013. Click here to go to a website with all details about this home and its sale.
Hershey designed many teak built-ins for the house – desk, bed and vanities, furniture and kitchen cabinets. Even the Hershey-designed dining room set remains with the house.
The current owners told us: “There are some really interesting details in this house, including a THIS CAR UP elevator plaque that lights up in the den we’re using as an office. My father-in-law thinks it’s from the Sibley building downtown. There are also 4 original Rittenhouse intercoms in the home, as well as a doorbell with speaker, though none of them work. We’ll get someone over here to look at them at some point, as I’d like to have them restored and put to use again.

East Avenue
1971
Bud Rusitzky
Photos

2333 Elmwood (#2325 after reconstruction)
1941
Dr. Burton B. Breese, Jr.
Town of Brighton records show that on 12-30-1940, Dr. Burton B. Breese, Jr. of 1080 Genesee Park Blvd., by his agent, J. H. Shirley, applied for and received a building permit to construct a two story frame dwelling measuring 52w x 24d with a 1248 sq ft basement office for the practice of medicine. The building had a 15.6 X 4.0 porch across the rear and a 26 x 24 attached garage.The plans were by Don Hershey. The mason and contractor was S & B Construction and the cost was put at $10,000.

By 1941 the house was constructed and occupied by Breese who was a pediatrician. Town of Brighton records show the house at 2333 Elmwood was badly damaged by fire in May 1960. A demo permit was issued on 06-01-1960 and a new house with a basement medical office was designed by Farragher & Macomber. The new building was renumbered 2325 Elmwood and served as the Breese home and the offices of Elmwood Pediatric until about 1980. The home was acquired by NYS as a Group home thereafter. They occupied it until the mid 2000’s when it was demolished and a new group home was erected in its place. (Thanks to Jim Weller for this information.)

Elmwood
1951
Art Stern
Alter & add (Is this the one that is “red stone house (medina stone?) between East and Allendale Columbia school” from our notes?)

255 Esplanade
1960
Richard Samuels
Photo

Esplanade
(Looks like a Hershey)
Photo

Esplanade
(Looks like a Hershey)
Photo

249 Forest Hills Road
1950
Photos

422 French Road
1953
J. Craytor (?)
Photos and more info

120 Georgian Court
1953
Photos

Georgian Court
1951
Dr. Morris (Mitt) Dankoff (Dankopf?) (Dantoff?)
Copper floor
Indicated by X by Hershey (probably refers to prestigious clients he rated between 1 and 3 X’s)

Georgian Court
1959
Gilbert-Green

221 Georgian Court
1964
Jack Erdle, millionaire. Jack was the founder of the Eldre Corporation in Rochester and Angers, France. Jack Erdle died at 93 on July 12, 2015. House still in the family.
Hershey favorite, Indicated by X by Hershey – 2 floors, some stone
Photo

104 Georgian Court
Pearl & Syd Rubin
Photo

Georgian Court
1970-1971
Max Rosenthal (Rosenberg?), Pres Kordite, millionaire
Indicated by XXX by Hershey
Stone on house

160 Georgian Court
1956
Dr. Alvin Ureles and his wife Frommel
(Possibly a Hershey) Michael Astarita wrote: This may be a Hershey home. I know this house, as I was good friends with the Ureles’ son. While I’m not positive who the architect was, I know for a fact that Bill Wirtheim was the cabinet maker on this home (and I suspect mine as well). Bill Wirtheim eventually struck out on his own and became a home builder and built his own home at 240 Hibiscus Dr (right next to a Hershey home at 230) and across the street from the house my parents built in 1966 at 215 Hibiscus Dr. which Bill Wirtheim also constructed. There is clearly a connection between Bill Wirtheim and Don Hershey. (Ken Hershey confirmed this saying that Bill was “the most outstanding cabinetmaker in the North Country.” Since Hershey designs featured extensive built-ins, he was an integral part of the Hershey team.) So it is quite possible that the Ureles home on Georgian Ct Rd is in fact a Hershey design. 

Michael Astarita later wrote: The Ureles house at 160 Georgian Ct. Rd however is NOT. Which is instructive because if you compare the exterior of this home to both 245 & 285 Council Rock, you’d swear they were designed by the same architect (also has a sunken living room and other Hershey-like interior attributes). Which means that very similar styled homes were being designed and built by another architectural firm and constructed in the same areas as Hershey homes. Which means that you can’t always judge a book…. So forget everything I told you about 160 Georgian Ct Rd other then that Bill Wirtheim was the cabinetmaker.

Georgian Court
Photos of 1 house (#170?) cited above but don’t know which house belonged to which owner above. (Not confirmed but looks like a Hershey.)

Georgian Court
Photos of 3 houses (#150, 145,131) cited above but don’t know which house belonged to which owner above. (Not confirmed but look like Hersheys.)

230 Hibiscus Drive
1970
Dr Alfred & Elaine Spagg
Helen & Jim Santelli wrote: We live at 230 Hibiscus Drive, a lovely Hershey home. The home on the other side, 240, is supposed to be a Hershey (that’s confirmed). There might be many hidden in the woods around here.
Photos

240 Hibiscus Drive
1965
Bill Wirtheim
Michael Astarita (see 160 Georgian Court above) wrote: Bill Wirtheim became a home builder and built his own home here and Hershey designed it. There is a connection between Bill Wirtheim (cabinet maker) and Don Hershey who incorporated so many built-in cabinets in his designs. #230 was next door (see 230 Hibiscus Drive above).

46 Knollwood
1954
Lester and Marge Gootnick
More information

72 Knollwood
1958
Dr. Victor Wolkin and Lois
Wolkin was an orthopedic surgeon. Michael Astarita and his wife bought the house from the Wolkin estate and they did extensive interior remodeling (keeping as much of the original interior built-in cabinets as they could) prior to moving into the house in January 1997. Michael has all the original construction drawings and uncovered a number of Don’s wall sketches under removed wallpaper which was apparently all the detail that the cabinet maker was given to produce all the built-ins on-site.
Photo

Mayflower Drive
1941-1942
Dr. Richard Young
Plans, New House brick

North Landing Road
(Near Blossom)
1938 (or 1941 per real estate listing)
Rudolf and Mildred Miller
curved window wall
“The original Hershey plans were there on display during an open house in the 80’s. As I recall they were dated in 1938. The house is actually on two levels which followed contours of the lot. Walking in the front door on the lower street level there was a relatively large U-shaped vestibule with large windows looking out at the tree that it was built around (the tree no longer standing). The rest of the first level was a square hall surrounded by three small bedrooms and a small bathroom. Then, climbing up a small staircase one comes to a small kitchen on the left, with banquette seating, beyond which was an open living and dining space, with fireplace, and beyond that a quite large screened-in porch over-looking the back yard. Everything was original at that time. it has since been sold several times and changes have been made.” (This description and photo was provided by Ron Richardson.)
Photos

North Landing Road
(Near Browncroft)
Dr. Merle Evans and his R.N. wife, Adele.
“They both practiced at the Genesee Hospital, and my mother knew them fairly well. Built on a steep lot, the front of the house has a curved window element, and opens out to a patio over the lower garage level. It’s crowded by trees now, but still visible.” (This description and photo was provided by Ron Richardson.)
Photo

North Landing Road
(Near Browncroft and Park Road)
“A kind-of modified tudor revival house which has some elements that definitely suggest Hershey involvement, including metal casement windows, some hipped roofs, and Medina stone around the recessed entry.” (This description and photo was provided by Ron Richardson.)
Photo

North Landing Road
1939-1942
Al Grube (Gube?)
New house stone

Pelham & Esplanade
1955
N. Brenner

Penfield Road
(between Weymouth and Commodore)
Early 1950’s
Winthrop and Mabel Heyer
Photo

San Rafael Drive
1970-1971 (House listed in book as a 1962 job)
Bernard (Buz) & Barbara Frank

San Rafael Drive
1955-1956
Silas Scinta

San Rafael Drive
1962
Victor & Janet Salitan

San Rafael Drive
Another home on this street

220 Sandringham Drive
1954
Milton Karz
Honorable Award. It was torn down and rebuilt in 2005.

5 South Landing Road
1938-1939 (Don Hershey and his wife moved into home in August)
Don Hershey
Exterior is Medina stone
Hershey received the Blue Ribbon, NYS
***A Hershey favorite***
See featured articles about this home.

9 South Landing Road
next to Don Hershey home
1939
Harlan (Harland) Miller House (or Brown)
New house of stone

115 Summit Drive
Dr. Forest Young
House, stucco-on metal (copper base) lath. Dr. Forest Young was director of the University of Rochester Medical Center’s Department of Plastic Surgery that was created in 1934. He moved to California in 1950.
Photos

Thackery Road
1955-1956
Phil Panfiel (Danfiel?)

Thackery Road
1955-1960
Julias Michaels (Micky & Julie?)

211 Thackery Road
1954
C. Ross
Also known as the Sid & Barbara Braverman Home
See articles featuring this home.

245 Thackery Road
1954-1955
Jessie (or S.?) Lipsih “Bingo Sam”
2004–owned by Martino.
Featured in Rochester’s Democrat & Chronicle July 5, 2014. (Article incorrectly stated it was 274 Thackery Road)
Photos

Thackery Road
1955-1960
Sol Bachlor

Thackery Road
1955-1956
Maurice Cameros

177 Trevor Court Road
1960
Dr. Pincus Sobie

W. Henrietta Rd. and Southland
(possibly a Hershey – corner house – blue with overhangs)

Weymouth
1948
Robert and Betty Pease
The current owner has lived in this home since 1972 – done some updating with an addition.
Photo

Weymouth
(it looks like a Hershey home)
Photo

 

14 thoughts on “Brighton, NY

    • It seems like Hershey homes are often a shade of brown. Probably because so many are wooden exterior. Ours is a concrete block house and is brown, as is our neighbors’ Hershey home. We also have a neighbor with a light green concrete block house and one with a cedar exterior that is a redish color. Generally, the colors do blend with nature – a typical Hershey setting being a wooded lot.

  1. To whoever is the creator of this terrific website,
    Myself and many others in the Rochester preservation community (Landmark Society and others included) would like to contribute information to your collection of research on Don Hershey and to talk to you about your work on Don Hershey’s career.

    Thank you for all that you do!

  2. My parents’ home at 344 Council Rock Ave., Rochester NY (Brighton) is a Don Hershey house. My father wanted a modern house in every sense of the word. The house is on one floor with an open plan. There are huge windows which allow views of the outdoors from all rooms. As with many Hershey houses, wood and stone are combined beautifully to give a textural feel inside and out. There was originally radiant heating throughout but when there was a difficulty, it was impossible to find the break to repair so baseboard heating was installed in the 60’s. The house is still in the famiily and still has a wonderfully modern feel and function.

    • Thank you for your comment about 344 Council Rock. I quoted it on the page about the house and wanted to make sure that’s OK with you? It’s always meaningful to hear from people who grew up in Hershey homes. Do you know which other homes are Hershey-designed on Council Rock? Or elsewhere in the neighborhood? I had access to Hershey’s notebooks but the house numbers didn’t exist when he designed the homes. In most cases he indicated the owner’s name and the street only. I suspect certain other houses on Council Rock to be Hersheys based on their design (#s 334, 321, 300) and I posted photos of these on http://www.donhershey.com/council-rock-3-other-homes/

  3. I own a Don Hershey home that was built 1950 near Park Rd and N.Landing. I have signed copies of his blueprints that were given to me by the last owner. I would love to connect with anyone that understood the engineering behind low voltage system. Doing some upgrades and insight would be great.

  4. Frederick J. Pfluke and his wife Louise E. resided at 548 Allens Creek Rd. in the Town of Pittsford. The home was built in about 1940. It is described as a two story wood frame dwelling with 3.5 baths, 4 bedrooms, 3 fireplaces and a garage. It contains approx. 2719 sfla and is situated on .74 acres.
    Fred. Pfluke was a gas engineer by profession.

  5. RE: 36 Brookside Dr.
    The present street address is 129 Brookside. It was built about 1930 with3.5 baths, 4 bdrms, 3526 sfla. The house was constructed on lot #41 of the East Brook Side Realty Co., Inc. subdivision. The first owners were NEEL, LAWRENCE O. & PAULINE S. Lawrence was the Sales Manager for the Genesee Brewing Co., Inc. They stayed in the house for about 15 months. In 1936 they moved into a home at 145 Brookside Dr., (lot #38 of the Brookside Subdivision).

    Re: 39 Brookside Dr.
    The present street address is 145 Brookside Dr. The first owners/occupants of 145 Brookside were Harold L. & May P. Brainard. They sold to Lawrence and Pauline Neel in 1936. The Neels remained in this dwelling until 1951. Both Lawrence and his wife were born about 1900 in Missouri. They sold to Frank B. & Aileen F. Alberts. Frank was a general agent with Aetna Life. The Alberts sold in 1978 to David M. and Charlotte H. Jacobstein. David was a lawyer. After a few more owners, the beer connection was re-established when the house was acquired by John B. & Judith Henderson. John was the Pres. and COO of the High Falls Brewing Co.

  6. Town of Brighton records show that on 12-30-1940, Dr. Burton B. Breese, Jr. of 1080 Genesee Park Blvd., by his agent, J. H. Shirley, applied for and received a building permit to construct a two story frame dwelling measuring 52w x 24d with a 1248 sq ft basement office for the practice of medicine. The building had a 15.6 X 4.0 porch across the rear and a 26 x 24 attached garage.The plans were by Don Hershey. The mason and contractor was S & B Construction and the cost was put at $10,000.
    By 1941 the house was constructed and occupied by Breese who was a pediatrician. TOB records show the house at 2333 Elmwood was badly damaged by fire in May 1960. A demo permit was issued on 06-01-1960 and a new house with a basement medical office was designed by Farragher & Macomber. The new building was renumbered 2325 Elmwood and served as the Breese home and the offices of Elmwood Pediatric until about 1980. The home was acquired by NYS as a Group home thereafter. They occupied it until the mid 2000’s when it was demolished and a new group home was erected in its place.

    I have a copy of the Hershey house building permit if you would like this for your file. The Town does have the original plans for the house but they are illegible due to water damage from a fire in the town hall years ago.

  7. Hi, I love your site. I just purchased 120 Thackeray Rd. Do you know if this home was designed by Don Hershey? Thanks for any help you can give.

    -Enna

    • Hi Enna, I don’t have anything in my notes but the town may be able to answer your question as to whether your house is a Hershey. I do know that there is a connection between your home’s builder, Bill Wirtheim (cabinet maker and later a builder) and Don Hershey who incorporated so many built-in cabinets in his designs. They apparently worked together on 240 Hibiscus. I ‘d love to know what you find out from the town.
      Thanks, Peggi

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